Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

Solution-focused approaches in the practice of UK educational psychologists: a study of the nature of their application and evidence of their effectiveness

Boyle, J.M.E. and Stobie, Ingeborg and Woolfson, Lisa (2005) Solution-focused approaches in the practice of UK educational psychologists: a study of the nature of their application and evidence of their effectiveness. School Psychology International, 26 (1). pp. 5-28. ISSN 0143-0343

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Solution-focused approaches are increasingly widely used in the practice of the applied educational psychologist (EP) (Ajmal and Rees, 2001; Durrant, 1993; Redpath and Harper, 1999; Rhodes and Ajmal, 1995). Based on a small-scale computer-mediated exploratory survey, this article examines the nature of such practice and investigates whether and how solution-focused practice is evaluated and contributes to EPs' knowledge and skills base. The exploratory study is integrated into an overview of solution-focused therapy and a literature review of the application of solution-focused practice by EPs. Based on the review and analysis of the survey, the article proposes ways by which solution-focused practice can be evaluated by busy EP practitioners and therefore become potentially evidence-based.