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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Interactive multiobjective optimization from a learning perspective

Belton, V. and Branke, J. and Eskelinen, P. and Greco, S. and Molina, J. and Ruiz, F. and Slowinski, R. (2008) Interactive multiobjective optimization from a learning perspective. In: Multiobjective Optimization Interactive and Evolutionary Approaches. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 5252 . Theoretical Computer Science and General, pp. 405-433. ISBN 978-3-540-88907-6

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Abstract

Learning is inherently connected with Interactive Multiobjective Optimization (IMO), therefore, a systematic analysis of IMO from the learning perspective is worthwhile. After an introduction to the nature and the interest of learning within IMO, we consider two complementary aspects of learning: individual learning, i.e., what the decision maker can learn, and model or machine learning, i.e., what the formal model can learn in the course of an IMO procedure. Finally, we discuss how one might investigate learning experimentally, in order to understand how to better support decision makers. Experiments involving a human decision maker or a virtual decision maker are considered.