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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Feminisation and paradox: stratification and segmentation in professional contexts

Bolton, S. and Muzio, D. (2006) Feminisation and paradox: stratification and segmentation in professional contexts. Irish Journal of Management, 1. pp. 79-93. ISSN 1649-248X

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Abstract

The past three decades have been characterised by dramatic labour-market developments including the mass entry of women into formerly exclusively male domains. Professional work is particularly indicative of this trend where growth in female membership has fuelled optimistic predictions of shattered glass ceilings and gender equality. This paper seeks to challenge these predictions and to explore the associated assumptions linked with the feminisation of professional work in the United Kingdown. It will do this by focusing on two professional groups: law and management which, despite some substantial differences, present a common and recurrent theme in that they celebrate and sustain a masculine vision of what it is to be a professional. This leads to a series of paradoxes as the professions are increasingly dependent on the contribution of their female members, yet women and women's work continue to be marginalised, downgraded and exploited.