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Femminizzazione e consolidamento organizzativo : alcune riflessioni sulla professione legale inglese

Bolton, Sharon and Munzio, D. (2006) Femminizzazione e consolidamento organizzativo : alcune riflessioni sulla professione legale inglese. Economia & Management, 5.

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Abstract

In the legal profession horizontal segregation (women's division between areas or not) reproduce situations of vertical stratification, helping to explain the role of women lawyers typically employed in group practices. This leads to a polarization between areas of net operating primarily female, underpaid and oriented to the solution of problems of a private nature, and legal areas dominated by men, and profit-oriented corporate-style activities. The analysis presented in this article explains the position of women lawyers based on a series of dynamic processes of discrimination that sanction of exclusion, subordination and marginalization. The horizontal segregation does not reflect the choices and attitudes of women lawyers, but responds to these prejudices that should occupy more roles consistent with their femininity. Women do not choose to work in those areas considered legal female: 45% rather than aspire to work in corporate law. However, only 33% manage to achieve this desire. In addition, while only 7% of female graduates express a desire to practice family law, 19% will end up dealing with the legal right in this area.