Picture of virus under microscope

Research under the microscope...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

Explore SIPBS research

Factors affecting the fate of ciprofloxacin in aquatic field systems

Cardoza, L.A. and Knapp, C.W. and Larive, C.K. and Belden, J.B. and Lydy, M. and Graham, D.W. (2005) Factors affecting the fate of ciprofloxacin in aquatic field systems. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 161 (1-4). pp. 383-398.

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Ciprofloxacin (cipro) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine that is readily transported into the environment via domestic wastewaters and through direct runoff. Although factors governing cipro fate are becoming understood, an integrated evaluation of disappearance mechanisms in aquatic systems has not been performed. Here we examined cipro disappearance rate in surface waters using both laboratory and field systems under different light, and dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) conditions to determine when photodegradation versus adsorption dominates cipro fate. Initial laboratory experiments showed that cipro rapidly photodegraded (t(1/2) ∼ 1.5 h) with numerous photodegradation products being noted when POC levels were low. However, even moderate water column POC levels resulted in reduced photodegradation ( no breakdown products detected) and soluble cipro disappearance rates were accelerated. C-14-ciprofloxacin studies confirmed significant adsorption onto aquatic POC (KOC values of 13,900 to 20,500 L/kg at neutral pH). In contrast, a follow-up mesocosm-scale field study using low POC water showed that photodegradation could also dominate cipro fate. In conclusion, both adsorption and photodegradation strongly influence cipro fate in aquatic systems, although the dominant mechanism appears to depend upon the ambient POC level.