Picture of wind turbine against blue sky

Open Access research with a real impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

The Energy Systems Research Unit (ESRU) within Strathclyde's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering is producing Open Access research that can help society deploy and optimise renewable energy systems, such as wind turbine technology.

Explore wind turbine research in Strathprints

Explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research content

Innovation activities in call and contact centres - an exploratory study

Smith, Marisa K. (2009) Innovation activities in call and contact centres - an exploratory study. PhD thesis, University Of Strathclyde.

[img]
Preview
PDF (strathprints016012.pdf)
strathprints016012.pdf

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Call and contact centres play an important role in the global economy, employing millions of people in the USA and UK and hundreds of thousands in other parts of Europe, Africa and Asia (Russell, 2008). They are often the main point of contact for customers accessing organisations, so have a key part to play in the overall perception customers have of the entire organisation (Dean, 2002). However, the centres in developed countries are facing increased pressures from low-cost alternatives in developing countries and increasing customer demands, which results in these centres needing to enhance their competitive advantage. One method for increased competitiveness is through an increased focus on innovation; organisations that can continually renew and adapt through advances in their services, products and processes will stay ahead of the competition (Bessant, 2003). Innovation is concerned with the organisational processes and tools necessary to translate ideas into new processes, products, services or businesses (Isaksen and Tidd, 2006). Although innovation poses many risks, organisations that do not renew their products, processes or services on a continuing basis place their survival in danger (Tidd et al., 2001).