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The marriage of Bourdieu and private ordering on Gretna's football field

Cooper, Christine and Joyce, Yvonne (2009) The marriage of Bourdieu and private ordering on Gretna's football field. In: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Accounting Conference, 2009-07-01. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

This paper presents an in-depth study of the insolvency of Gretna football club. It sets the insolvency within the wider context of the field of football in Scotland and the special rules of the field which apply immediately upon the insolvency of a club and which are arguably at odds with general insolvency regulation in the UK. Insolvency presents a unique opportunity to study fields since it is at this point when there is a shortfall of funds that the field's power relations become most clear and the struggles on the field more visible. In order to provide a more nuanced complex picture of the football field, its actors and regulations, especially those relating to insolvency, this paper draws upon the work of Pierre Bourdieu. It also draws upon the concept of private ordering since the insolvency rules set by the governing body of the Scottish Premier League (a private company) have an impact that extend beyond the members of the League.