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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

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Union formation in the Indian call centre/BPO industry

Taylor, P. and D'Cruz, Premilla and Noronha, Ernesto and Scholarios, Dora (2009) Union formation in the Indian call centre/BPO industry. In: The Next available Operator: Managing Human Resources in Indian Business Process Outsourcing Industry. Sage, New Delhi. ISBN 9788178299327

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Abstract

The 'globalisation' of business services facilitated by Information and Consultation Technologies has accelerated at breathtaking pace. The relocation of interactive service work and an expanding range of back-office processes from the so-called developed countries of the global north to the developing countries of the global south increasingly constitutes a core element in corporate strategies. The widespread usage of the term global service delivery reflects the transformative role played by TNCs and the intervention of states in extending the reach of capital accumulation and in re-configuring service supply chains to multiple geographies. In this rapidly unfolding global landscape where, amongst others, the Philippines, South Africa, Latin American and Eastern Europe states are emerging destinations, India remains pre-eminent, accounting for 46 per cent of global business process outsourcing (BPO) (Nasscom-McKinsey 2005). According to an influential survey, India 'still offers an unbeatable mix of low costs, deep technical and language skills, mature vendors and supportive government policies' (Walker and Gott 2007: 29).