Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Oligomerisation and thermal stability of polyvalent integrin α5β1 ligands

Kreiner, Michaela and Byron, Olwyn and Domingues, Diana and van der Walle, Christopher F. (2009) Oligomerisation and thermal stability of polyvalent integrin α5β1 ligands. Biophysical Chemistry, 142 (1-3). pp. 34-39. ISSN 0301-4622

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Synthetic oligomeric integrin α5β1 ligands, specifically immobilised to surfaces, facilitate increased fibroblast cell spreading compared with that associated with the monomer. These ligands consist of a N-terminal fibronectin domain pair, a spacer and a di-, tri- or tetrameric coiled coil. However, it is not yet clear what effect fusion of the fibronectin domains has on the predicted oligomerisation of the coiled coils. Using analytical ultracentrifugation we show that the predicted tetrameric and trimeric coiled coils facilitate a corresponding ligand oligomerisation with half-dissociation at 0.7 and 0.2 µM, respectively. In contrast, the predicted dimeric coiled coil formed both dimers and trimers. Under non-reducing conditions, the unique C-terminal thiol-facilitated inter-oligomer dimerisation of the trimeric species, generating hexameric ligands. Disulphide bonding also increased helical stability during thermal unfolding. The work allows the cellular response to these clustered integrin α5β1 ligands to be more accurately interpreted, and has wider implications with respect to the utility of coiled coils as tools to facilitate protein oligomerisation.