Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

The Toxoplasma gondii plastid replication and repair enzyme complex, PREX

Mukhopadhyay, A and Chen, C-Y and Doerig, C and Henriquez, F L and Roberts, C W and Barrett, M P and Roberts, Craig (2009) The Toxoplasma gondii plastid replication and repair enzyme complex, PREX. Parasitology, 136 (7). pp. 747-755. ISSN 0031-1820

[img]
Preview
PDF (S0031182009006027a)
S0031182009006027a.pdf - Final Published Version
License: Unspecified

Download (222kB) | Preview

Abstract

A plastid-like organelle, the apicoplast, is essential to the majority of medically and veterinary important apicomplexan protozoa including Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium. The apicoplast contains multiple copies of a 35 kb genome, the replication of which is dependent upon nuclear-encoded proteins that are imported into the organelle. In P. falciparum an unusual multi-functional gene, pfprex, was previously identified and inferred to encode a protein with DNA primase, DNA helicase and DNA polymerase activities. Herein, we report the presence of a prex orthologue in T. gondii. The protein is predicted to have a bi-partite apicoplast targeting sequence similar to that demonstrated on the PfPREX polypeptide, capable of delivering marker proteins to the apicoplast. Unlike the P. falciparum gene that is devoid of introns, the T. gondii prex gene carries 19 introns, which are spliced to produce a contiguous mRNA. Bacterial expression of the polymerase domain reveals the protein to be active. Consistent with the reported absence of a plastid in Cryptosporidium species, in silico analysis of their genomes failed to demonstrate an orthologue of prex. These studies indicate that prex is conserved across the plastid-bearing apicomplexans and may play an important role in the replication of the plastid genome.