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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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The Origins of Hospitality and Tourism

O'Gorman, K.D. (2010) The Origins of Hospitality and Tourism. Goodfellow. ISBN 978-1-906884-08-6

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Abstract

The Origins of Hospitality and Tourism is about the true origins of the hospitality and tourism industry, identifying how an understanding of the past can inform modern approaches to hospitality and tourism management. It includes: A detailed and factual account of the origins of the underlying principles and practices of hospitality and tourism; Provides a unique insight into the evolution of hospitality and the roles of 'guest' and 'host' as we recognise them today; Focusses on the social, economic and geographical influences from Classical Antiquity to the Renaissance; Serves as an introductory text for Hospitality and Tourism Studies, as well as providing a sound foundation for postgraduate studies. Divided into 10 chapters, ideal for semester teaching, The Origins of Hospitality and Tourism provides a structured approach and supporting information for those wanting to develop their knowledge and understanding of the phenomenon of hospitality. It covers the study of, and the development of understanding of, the origins of hospitality traditions within the domestic, civic and commercial contexts of hospitality, and develops this into the presentation of a new Dynamic Model of Hospitality.