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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

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Automation to maximise distributed generation contribution and reduce network losses

Bell, K.R.W. and Quinonez-Varela, G. and Burt, G.M. (2009) Automation to maximise distributed generation contribution and reduce network losses. In: CIRED, 2009-06-08 - 2009-06-11.

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Abstract

This paper demonstrates the potential benefits of utilisation of distributed generation (DG) in reducing network losses and of automatic post-fault actions in maximising DG output. A number of quantified examples are presented, based on simulations, for two actual distribution networks in the UK using reconfiguration of normally open points and inter-tripping of generation. The results show that a noteworthy reduction in losses might be achieved, and demonstrate the extent to which the actual results depend on the configuration of the network, the level of demand and the amount of DG in operation. It is argued that the benefits in terms of reduction of losses and maximisation of DG output are significant enough and the automation technology mature enough to justify investment in appropriate metering, communication and control, but that current commercial arrangements often prevent appropriate automation measures from being implemented