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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

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Design of a highly accurate optical sensor system for pressure and temperature monitoring in oil wells

Fusiek, G. and Niewczas, P. and McDonald, J.R. (2009) Design of a highly accurate optical sensor system for pressure and temperature monitoring in oil wells. In: 2009 IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference, 2009-05-05 - 2011-05-07.

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Abstract

This paper provides details of the potential designs of a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) sensor which forms part of a highly accurate optical measurement system for permanent monitoring of pressure and temperature in oil wells. The proposed sensors are of a hybrid construction and comprise two different types of spectrally encoded transducers - a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity, which are connected in series. The FBG and FP sensors are used primarily to measure temperature and pressure, respectively. Because of the two different applications currently addressed - oil-sand production and deep-well oil production - and their associated different ranges of pressure to be measured (0-3000 psi and 0-15000 psi respectively), different dedicated sensor constructions are described. All transducers are designed to operate in the 0- 400degC temperature range. The requirement that the sensors meet the accuracy of 0.1% of the full measurement scale is discussed in details and is evaluated using analytical methods and simulation.