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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

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Influence of the wavelength-dependence of fiber couplers on the background signal in wavelength modulation spectroscopy with RAM-nulling

Chakraborty, Arup Lal and Ruxton, Keith C. and Johnstone, W. (2010) Influence of the wavelength-dependence of fiber couplers on the background signal in wavelength modulation spectroscopy with RAM-nulling. Optics Express, 18 (1). pp. 267-280. ISSN 1094-4087

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Abstract

Recently a technique to optically eliminate the background residual amplitude modulation in 1f wavelength modulation spectroscopy was demonstrated, where perfect elimination throughout the scan range was not achieved due to the wavelength-dependence of couplers and that of the laser intensity modulation. This paper theoretically analyzes the technique and experimentally demonstrates that the elimination can be perfect for one of three possible experimental configurations, making this important for potential applications with some recently-developed laser sources. For the other configurations a non-zero background slope is predicted, experimentally verified, and the anomalous nature of signals is thereby explained. A common signal normalization method is devised that is independent of the signal slope, a fact that is important for industrial deployment of such systems.