Strathprints logo
Strathprints Home | Open Access | Browse | Search | User area | Copyright | Help | Library Home | SUPrimo

Instrumented transducer for study of the bat echolocation process

McGuire, M. and Hayward, G. and Pierce, S.G. and Flockhart, G.M.H. (2009) Instrumented transducer for study of the bat echolocation process. In: Fifth International Conference on Bio-Acoustics, 2009-03-31 - 2009-04-02, Loughborough, UK. (Unpublished)

[img]
Preview
PDF (BIOACOUSTICS_2009_-_draft_StrathPrints.pdf)
BIOACOUSTICS_2009_-_draft_StrathPrints.pdf

Download (147kB) | Preview

Abstract

Evolution has enabled the bat to echolocate with ease and efficiency, to the extent that the bats capabilities far exceed the most technologically advanced manmade systems. Such capabilities reinforce mans intrigue in the animal kingdom. In studying bats we aspire to quantify and understand their inherent skills in the hope of transferring them to engineering systems. In trying to further our understanding of the animal kingdom it is often the case that we try to replicate or mimic what the animal is doing. In terms of echolocation it is thought that a bat emits a signal and retains memory of an exact copy to be used in conjunction with the returning echo to reveal information about the target. To emulate the vocalisation and auditory system of a bat it is necessary to both accurately generate and detect sound waves.

Item type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
ID code: 14731
Keywords: bats, echolocation, sound waves, intelligent transducers, echolocation signals, Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering, Animal culture
Subjects: Technology > Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
Agriculture > Animal culture
Department: Faculty of Engineering > Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Depositing user: Strathprints Administrator
Date Deposited: 25 Oct 2010 10:19
Last modified: 24 Apr 2015 22:30
Related URLs:
URI: http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/14731

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item