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Optical imaging with scanning MEMS mirror : a single photodetector approach

Li, L. and Mirza, M.A. and Stankovic, V. and Li, Lijie and Stankovic, Lina and Uttamchandani, D.G. and Cheng, S. (2009) Optical imaging with scanning MEMS mirror : a single photodetector approach. In: IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, 2009-11-07 - 2009-11-10.

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Abstract

This paper describes an optical system for low-complexity optical image acquisition based on a single scanning MEMS mirror and a single photodetector. The overall aim of the research is to investigate techniques for image acquisition at electromagnetic wavelengths where the cost and/or technical maturity of detector arrays pose a limitation. In contrast to similar systems built using a digital micromirror device (DMD), the present configuration has advantages of lower cost and potential applicability across a wide spectrum, ranging from visible to Terahertz frequencies. In the present arrangement, light at visible wavelengths from the object passes through a telescope and falls onto a small, scanning MEMS micromirror. The entire image of the object is projected onto the mirror surface and reflected towards a single photodetector with a pinhole at its entrance. Similarly to conventional scanning, by finely changing the tilt-angle of the mirror, the detector sees different areas of the projected image, thereby building up an image pixel-by-pixel. Resolution is increased by allowing for an overlap between neighbouring scanned areas. Iterative bilinear interpolation and wavelet denoising are employed to enhance image quality.