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Development of Strathclyde University Data Logging System (SUDALS) for use with flexible electrogoniometers

Indra Mohan, V.P. and Valsan, G. and Rowe, P.J. (2009) Development of Strathclyde University Data Logging System (SUDALS) for use with flexible electrogoniometers. In: Biodevices 2009: International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices, 2009-01-14 - 2009-01-17.

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Abstract

We have developed a 6 channel battery operated remote control microprocessor based system that collects data from flexible electrogoniometers and force sensing resistors attached to the lower extremities of the body. During functional activities, the user-friendly system stores the data from these transducers and transfers the same to a PC at the end of the recording period via a bluetooth connection. Software on the PC then displays the angular displacement and allows visual inspection of the entire sequence of recordings or particular events of interest. This system was tested on 10 normal subjects and the pattern pertaining to the flexion/extension of knee during range of activities of daily living (ADL) such as walking, ascending and descending stairs, in and out of a chair and deep squatting were recorded and found to be reproducible and similar to those reported in the literature. This paper was presented at Biodevices 2009: International Conference on Biomedical Electronics and Devices.