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Evaporation of a thin droplet on a thin substrate with a high thermal resistance

Dunn, Gavin and Wilson, S.K. and Duffy, B.R. and Sefiane, K. (2009) Evaporation of a thin droplet on a thin substrate with a high thermal resistance. Physics of Fluids, 21. ISSN 1070-6631

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Abstract

A mathematical model for the quasi-steady evaporation of a thin liquid droplet on a thin substrate that incorporates the dependence of the saturation concentration of vapour at the free surface of the droplet on temperature is used to examine an atypical situation in which the substrate has a high thermal resistance relative to the droplet (i.e. it is highly insulating and/or is thick relative to the droplet). In this situation diffusion of heat through the substrate is the rate-limiting evaporative process and at leading order the local mass flux is spatially uniform, the total evaporation rate is proportional to the surface area of the droplet, and the droplet is uniformly cooled. In particular, the qualitative differences between the predictions of the present model in this situation and those of the widely used 'basic' model in which the saturation concentration is independent of temperature are highlighted.