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Visual methods: Using photographs to capture hosts' favourite space within their commercial home

Sweeney, M. and Lynch, P.A. (2009) Visual methods: Using photographs to capture hosts' favourite space within their commercial home. In: 3rd International Critical Tourism Studies Conference, 2009-06-21 - 2009-06-24. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Hospitality research has given rise to the concept of the commercial home which recognises hybrid space for public as well as private purposes, and is therefore particularly complex. This paper offers a critical analysis of people-place-space relationships through exploration of commercial home owners and their favourite place within the home. The commercial home challenges traditional conceptions of public/private space largely because of its contested and fluid usage. Research methods draw upon interviews, observations and photographs taken of commercial home hosts in areas of their home they have identified as their favourite place. The study highlights the importance of suitable research methods, focusing on moving away from the limitations of conventional methods. The aim of this paper is to elaborate the use of photo-elicitation as a method of data collection as well as a method of analysis. By using a study where photographs were used in in-depth interviews, analysis is illustrated through the hosts narratives and experiences. Concepts of space, time, and place attachment are identified and discussed.