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Working with girls and young women

Batchelor, Susan (2004) Working with girls and young women. In: Women Who Offend. Jessica Kingsley, London. ISBN 1843101548

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Abstract

Part I Female offending and responses to it: Female offending - a theoretical overview, Loraine Gelsthorpe; breaking the mould - patterns of female offending, Michele Burman; from 'a safer to a better way' - transformations in penal policy for women, Jacqueline Tombs; why are more women being sentenced to custody? Carol Hedderman. Part II Women in the criminal justice system: living with paradox - community supervision of women offenders, Judith Rumgay; service with a smile? Women and community 'punishment', Gill McIvor; women in prison, Nancy Loucks; women's release from prison - the case for change, Christine Wilkinson; black women and the criminal justice system, Ruth Chigwada-Bailey. Part III Contemporary issues: risk, dangerousness and female offenders, Hazel Kemshall; the 'criminogenic' needs of women offenders - what should a programme for women focus on? Carol Hedderman; women, drug use and the criminal justice system, Margaret Malloch; working with girls and young women, Susan Batchelor and Michele Burman; no place like home - accommodating women who offend, Gill McIvor.