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A prospective randomised double-blind study of functional outcome and range of flexion following total knee replacement with the NexGen standard and high flexion components

Nutton, R.W. and Van der Linden, M.L. and Rowe, P.J. and Gaston, P. and Wade, F.A. (2008) A prospective randomised double-blind study of functional outcome and range of flexion following total knee replacement with the NexGen standard and high flexion components. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume, 90-B (1). pp. 37-42.

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Abstract

Modifications in the design of knee replacements have been proposed in order to maximise flexion. We performed a prospective double-blind randomised controlled trial to compare the functional outcome, including maximum knee flexion, in patients receiving either a standard or a high flexion version of the NexGen legacy posterior stabilised total knee replacement. A total of 56 patients, half of whom received each design, were assessed preoperatively and at one year after operation using knee scores and analysis of range of movement using electrogoniometry. For both implant designs there was a significant improvement in the function component of the knee scores (p < 0.001) and the maximum range of flexion when walking on the level, ascending and descending a slope or stairs (all p < 0.001), squatting (p < 0.020) and stepping into a bath (p = 0.024). There was no significant difference in outcome, including the maximum knee flexion, between patients receiving the standard and high flexion designs of this implant.