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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Entrepreneurship, corporate governance, and Indian business elites

Chia, R. and MacLean, Nayak A. and Harvey, C. (2007) Entrepreneurship, corporate governance, and Indian business elites. International Journal of Indian Culture and Business Management, 1 (1/2). pp. 9-27. ISSN 1753-0806

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Abstract

Despite the rhetoric of borderless transnational corporations driven by the homogenising trends in globalisation, nation states and national identities continue to play an important role in structuring national managerial mentalities and dispositions. In this paper, we examine the entrepreneurial spirit of Indian industrialists and the emerging importance of corporate governance for globalising Indian businesses. We argue that corporate governance regimes and the entrepreneurialism exhibited within a national context are, to a considerable degree, self referring, being supported and informed by pre-existing social structures, norms and practices. We explore the corporate lives and careers of the directors of the SENSEX (top 30) companies from a practice perspective, and show that corporate governance and entrepreneurialism emerge as mediating symbolic forms embedding national values, institutional practices, and individual dispositions. The data and arguments presented in this paper stem from a larger, ongoing study into entrepreneurship, corporate governance, and Indian business elites; our preliminary analysis suggests a complex web of connections between these social elements.