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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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PAR-2 mediates increased inflammatory cell adhesion and neointima formation following vascular injury in the mouse

Tennant, G.M. and Wadsworth, Roger M. and Kennedy, Simon (2007) PAR-2 mediates increased inflammatory cell adhesion and neointima formation following vascular injury in the mouse. Atherosclerosis, 198 (1). pp. 57-64. ISSN 0021-9150

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Abstract

Activation of PAR-2 in the vasculature affects vascular tone and adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium. Since adhesion of leukocytes is increased following vascular injury and is important in determining the extent of neointima formation, we hypothesised that mice lacking PAR-2 may have reduced neointima formation following vascular injury. PAR-2 activating peptides and trypsin induced endothelium-dependent relaxation of mouse carotid artery which was absent in the knockout mouse. Lack of a PAR-2 receptor did not affect lymphocyte adhesion under basal conditions, but reduced the contractile response produced by lymphocytes. Twenty-eight days after denuding injury, vessel contraction to lymphocytes was reduced in both strains while lymphocyte adhesion was significantly greater in PAR-2+/+ mice compared to the PAR-2 knockout mice. Neointimal area was markedly reduced in the PAR-2 knockout mouse. Our data show that PAR-2 modulates inflammatory cell adhesion when stimulated and in mice lacking the PAR-2 receptor, adhesion to injured vessels is reduced with a consequent reduction in neointima formation.