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Bandwidth efficient multi-station wireless streaming based on complete complementary sequences

Khirallah, C. and Stankovic, V. and Stankovic, L. and Yang, Y. and Xiong, Z. (2009) Bandwidth efficient multi-station wireless streaming based on complete complementary sequences. IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, 8 (2). pp. 552-556. ISSN 1536-1276

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Abstract

Data streaming from multiple base stations to a client is recognized as a robust technique for multimedia streaming. However the resulting transmission in parallel over wireless channels poses serious challenges, especially multiple access interference, multipath fading, noise effects and synchronization. Spread spectrum techniques seem the obvious choice to mitigate these effects, but at the cost of increased bandwidth requirements. This paper proposes a solution that exploits complete complementary spectrum spreading and data compression techniques jointly to resolve the communication challenges whilst ensuring efficient use of spectrum and acceptable bit error rate. Our proposed spreading scheme reduces the required transmission bandwidth by exploiting correlation among information present at multiple base stations. Results obtained show 1.75 Mchip/sec (or 25%) reduction in transmission rate, with only up to 6 dB loss in frequency-selective channel compared to a straightforward solution based solely on complete complementary spectrum spreading.