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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Transmission use of system charges under future power system scenarios

Ault, G.W. and Elders, I.M. and Green, R. (2007) Transmission use of system charges under future power system scenarios. IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, 22 (4). pp. 1523-1531. ISSN 0885-8950

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Abstract

If transmission charges are to reflect costs, they should be affected by the location of demand and generation. This paper describes the investment cost-related pricing (ICRP) methodology used to calculate transmission charges in Great Britain (GB), which is based on the marginal investment cost of additional demand or generation, using a dc load flow transport model. We apply this existing method to calculate charges for the Supergen FutureNet scenarios for 2020. This study highlights the sensitivities in charges for use of the transmission system arising from plausible demand and generation developments. The changes in tariffs will present financial challenges for system users in some areas. The objective of the work presented is to illustrate the sensitivity of the charges produced by this methodology to changes in demand, generation, and network topology rather than compare alternative pricing approaches. The conclusion drawn is that the ICRP system pricing method may be suitable in future years but only with some important issues investigated and resolved.