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Multiplexing fibre optic near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy as an emerging technology to monitor industrial bioprocesses

Roychoudhury, P. and O'Kennedy, R. and McNeil, B. and Harvey, L.M. (2007) Multiplexing fibre optic near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy as an emerging technology to monitor industrial bioprocesses. Analytica Chimica Acta, 590 (1). pp. 110-117. ISSN 0003-2670

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Abstract

The application of near infrared spectroscopy in bioprocessing has been limited by its dependence on calibrations derived from single bioreactor at a given time. Here, we propose a multiplexed calibration technique which allows calibrations to be built from multiple bioreactors run in parallel. This gives the flexibility to monitor multiple vessels and facilitates calibration model transfer between bioreactors. Models have been developed for the two key analytes: glucose and lactate using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines and using analyte specific information obtained from the feasibility studies. We observe slight model degradation for the multiplexed models in comparison to the conventional (single probe) models, decrease in r2 values from 89.4% to 88% for glucose whereas for lactate from 92% to 91.8% and a simultaneous increase in the number of factors as the model incorporates the inter-probe variability, nevertheless the models were fit for purpose. The results of this particular application of implementing multiplexed-NIRS to monitor multiple bioreactor vessels are very encouraging, as successful models have been built on-line and validated externally, which proffers the prospect of reducing timelines in monitoring the vessels considerably, and in turn, providing improved control.