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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Tolerant t cells display impaired trafficking ability

Mirenda, V. and Millington, O.R. and Lechler, R.I. and Scott, D. and Mernandez-Fuentes, M.P. and Read, J. and Tan, P.H. and George, A.J. and Garside, P. and Marelli-Berg, F.M. (2005) Tolerant t cells display impaired trafficking ability. European Journal of Immunology, 35 (7). pp. 2146-2156. ISSN 0014-2980

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Abstract

Based on our previous observation that anergic T lymphocytes lose their migratory ability in vitro, we have proposed that anergic T cells are retained in the site where they have been generated to exert their regulatory function. In this study we have analyzed T lymphocyte trafficking and motility following the induction of tolerance in vivo. In a model of non-deletional negative vaccination to xenoantigens in which dendritic cells (DC) localize to specific lymphoid sites depending on the route of administration, tolerant T cells remained localized in the lymph nodes colonized by tolerogenic DC, while primed T cells could traffic efficiently. Using an oral tolerance model that enables the ‘tracking’ of ovalbumin-specific TCR-transgenic T cells, we confirmed that T cells lose the ability to migrate through syngeneic endothelial cell monolayers following tolerance induction in vivo. Finally, we show that tolerant T cells (both in vitro and ex vivo) can inhibit migration of responsive T cells in an antigen-independent manner. Thus, hyporesponsive T cells localize at the site of tolerance induction in vivo, where they exert their anti-inflammatory properties. In physiological terms, this effect is likely to render immunoregulation a more efficient and controllable event.