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Professional development of pharmaceutical care in type 2 diabetes mellitus : a multidisciplinary conceptual model

Power, A. and Douglas, E. and McGregor, A. and Hudson, S.A. (2006) Professional development of pharmaceutical care in type 2 diabetes mellitus : a multidisciplinary conceptual model. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 14. pp. 289-299. ISSN 0961-7671

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Abstract

Objective To generate a validated model of care providing a framework for continued professional development of the community pharmacist for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Setting A purposive sample of medical, nursing and community pharmacist interviewees in 10 health boards in Scotland. Method Investigation, using a semi-structured questionnaire approach, of the views held by 19 healthcare practitioners. Key findings A model of multidisciplinary diabetes care was generated to aid definition of pharmaceutical care provision. Processes emphasised in the model were: compliance monitoring, agreed multidisciplinary protocols and the continuity of patient education. Potential areas for community pharmacist contributions included the running of diabetes clinics, provision of patient education, near-patient testing, repeat dispensing and identification of clinic defaulters. Conclusions Development of the community pharmacists' role for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus requires extensions to current independently delivered patient-centred services through working in partnership with other professionals. Methods of improved communication and attention to methods of referral, where appropriate, are important focal points. The targeting of this care and the care model that is best suited to particular settings will be subject to local variation. The generation of a diabetes care model offers pharmacists a means of matching learning opportunities to their needs. It is also a step towards the development of appropriate continued professional development tools and systems to equip community pharmacists for the future