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Nae too bad: a survey of job satisfaction, staff morale and qualifications in residential child care in Scotland

Milligan, I.M. and Kendrick, A. and Avan, G. (2004) Nae too bad: a survey of job satisfaction, staff morale and qualifications in residential child care in Scotland. Working paper. Scottish Institute for Residential Child Care.

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Abstract

The report of the National Children’s Bureau study of staff morale, qualifications and retention in England (Mainey, 2003) rightly highlighted a number of crucial issues facing providers of residential child care. Entitled Better Than You Think the key finding was that the rates of morale and job satisfaction were not low despite the adverse environment in which residential care operates. Residential care in the modern world is intended to be mainly a temporary placement for some of the most demanding young people who require out-of-home care. However, as with foster care, significant numbers of young people are spending years in out-of-home care and many residential services have to accommodate a wide variety of needs within a single unit. This general remit is challenging enough but the sector also continues to struggle with the aftermath of a number of high profile public inquiries which have identified instances of abuse of children and young people in residential care (Kent, 1997; Utting, 1997; Waterhouse, 2000).