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In situ characterisation of CD4+ t cell behaviour in mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues during the induction of oral priming and tolerance

Zinselmeyer, B.H. and Dempster, J. and Gurney, A.M. and Wokosin, D.L. and Miller, M. and Ho, H. and Millington, O.R. and Smith, K.M. and Rush, C.M. and Parker, I. and Cahalan, M. and Brewer, J.M. and Garside, P. (2005) In situ characterisation of CD4+ t cell behaviour in mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues during the induction of oral priming and tolerance. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 201 (11). pp. 1815-1823. ISSN 0022-1007

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Abstract

The behavior of antigen-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes during initial exposure to antigen probably influences their decision to become primed or tolerized, but this has not been examined directly in vivo. We have therefore tracked such cells in real time, in situ during the induction of oral priming versus oral tolerance. There were marked contrasts with respect to rate and type of movement and clustering between naive T cells and those exposed to antigen in immunogenic or tolerogenic forms. However, the major difference when comparing tolerized and primed T cells was that the latter formed larger and longer-lived clusters within mucosal and peripheral lymph nodes. This is the first comparison of the behavior of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in situ in mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues during the induction of priming versus tolerance in a physiologically relevant model in vivo.