Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

In vivo evaluation of nicotine lyophilised nasal insert in sheep

McInnes, F.J. and Thapa, P. and Baillie, A.J. and Welling, P. and Watson, D.G. and Gibson, I. and Nolan, A. and Stevens, H. (2005) In vivo evaluation of nicotine lyophilised nasal insert in sheep. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 304 (1-2). pp. 72-82. ISSN 0378-5173

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

The nasal route offers an attractive means of delivering a drug directly to the systemic circulation and avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism, although rapid mucociliary clearance can be detrimental to nasal absorption. The in vitro and in vivo characteristics of a nasal insert formulation prepared by lyophilisation of a viscous HPMC gel solution designed to overcome this problem were studied. In vitro release of nicotine from the lyophilised insert was compared with powder and spray formulations. Stability and characterisation studies were carried out using dynamic vapour sorption, scanning electron microscopy and HPLC analysis. Nicotine formulations were administered to eight wether sheep in a randomised four-way cross-over study, and plasma nicotine assessed comparing the nasal insert formulation with conventional nasal powder, nasal spray and IV doses. In vitro release studies demonstrated prolonged nicotine release from the nasal insert formulation compared to a powder and liquid. In vivo plasma profiles appeared to show prolonged plasma nicotine levels compared to the conventional formulations, although Tmax, Cmax and AUC parameters for the insert were not significantly different due to high variability in the pharmacokinetic data. In conclusion, the nasal insert displayed a promising prolonged plasma profile, which must be investigated further to provide statistical significance to prove the effect.