Picture of virus under microscope

Research under the microscope...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

Explore SIPBS research

Bead-based dna diagnostic assay for chlamydia using nanoparticle-mediated surface-enhanced resonance raman scattering detection within a lab-on-a-chip format

Monaghan, P.B. and McCarney, K.M. and Ricketts, Alastair and Littleford, R.E. and Docherty, F.T. and Smith, W.E. and Graham, D. and Cooper, J. (2007) Bead-based dna diagnostic assay for chlamydia using nanoparticle-mediated surface-enhanced resonance raman scattering detection within a lab-on-a-chip format. Analytical Chemistry, 79 (7). pp. 2844-2849. ISSN 0003-2700

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

There is a continued interest in the development of new on-chip protocols for the determination of the causes of infectious disease. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) for detecting the clinically relevant nucleic acid sequences of Chlamydia trachomatis in a bead-based lab-on-a-chip format, incorporating a solid-phase sample clean-up on-chip. The assay uses streptavidinated polymer microspheres to capture a biotinylated PCR product of the oligonucleotide sequence, which was subsequently hybridized against a complementary rhodamine-labeled, Raman active probe. Central to the assay is an in-channel integrated microfilter, which was used to retain the microspheres, enabling the bound target to be separated from the rest of the sample as part of a solid-phase clean-up (thereby removing any contributions from the background). After washing, the bound Rhodamine labeled detection probe was released thermally from the microspheres by heating and was subsequently mixed on-chip with a stream of silver nanoparticles. The signal was detected downstream using a Raman spectrometer to collect the SERRS response. The assay offers several advantages over traditional laboratory methods, including: the speed of the assay on-chip, the potential for sample clean-up; and the low volume of sample required.