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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Cyclic ADP-ribose increases Ca2+ removal in smooth muscle

Bradley, K.N. and Currie, S. and MacMillan, D. and Muir, T.C. and McCarron, J.G. (2003) Cyclic ADP-ribose increases Ca2+ removal in smooth muscle. Journal of Cell Science, 116. pp. 4291-306. ISSN 0021-9533

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Abstract

Ca2+ release via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) is vital in cell signalling and regulates diverse activities such as gene expression and excitation-contraction coupling. Cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), a proposed modulator of RyR activity, releases Ca2+ from the intracellular store in sea urchin eggs but its mechanism of action in other cell types is controversial. In this study, caged cADPR was used to examine the effect of cADPR on Ca2+ signalling in single voltage-clamped smooth muscle cells that have RyR but lack FKBP12.6, a proposed target for cADPR. Although cADPR released Ca2+ in sea urchin eggs (a positive control), it failed to alter global or subsarcolemma [Ca2+]c, to cause Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release or to enhance caffeine responses in colonic myocytes. By contrast, caffeine (an accepted modulator of RyR) was effective in these respects. The lack of cADPR activity on Ca2+ release was unaffected by the introduction of recombinant FKBP12.6 into the myocytes. Indeed in western blots, using brain membrane preparations as a source of FKBP12.6, cADPR did not bind to FKBPs, although FK506 was effective. However, cADPR increased and its antagonist 8-bromo-cADPR slowed the rate of Ca2+ removal from the cytoplasm. The evidence indicates that cADPR modulates [Ca2+]c but not via RyR; the mechanism may involve the sarcolemma Ca2+ pump.